Words Matter: Standing with Connecticut’s LGBTQ Youth

***PLEASE SEE INFORMATION ON THE CHRO SYMPOSIUM CONCERNING TRANS STUDENTS IN CT PUBLIC SCHOOLS BELOW*** It is a strange thing to have to be reminded that words could and do, in fact, “matter.” This seems obvious. And yet it was just this contention—this ordinary fact—which formed the kernel of a press conference organized at the … More Words Matter: Standing with Connecticut’s LGBTQ Youth

Remembering Stonewall: LGBT Resistance and Pride in Connecticut

48 years ago today, just after 3 a.m., New York City police raided a gay bar in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan called the Stonewall Inn. In the landscape of late 1960s New York, where solicitation of homosexual sex was still officially outlawed, such raids were far from unusual. Gay bars in the city … More Remembering Stonewall: LGBT Resistance and Pride in Connecticut

The Rainbow Court: How the Supreme Court is Changing the Lives of LGBT Americans while the Struggle Continues

By: Nick Kapoor, CHRO Commissioner The Supreme Court of the United States is at the apex of a co-equal branch of our government. Its decisions are usually final and affect the lives of every American. The Court has and continues to have a large impact on LGBT Americans. But is the fight over? Are LGBT … More The Rainbow Court: How the Supreme Court is Changing the Lives of LGBT Americans while the Struggle Continues

2017 KIDS COURT COMPETITION HELD AT THE STATE CAPITOL

The Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities hosted its annual Kids Court Competition at the State Capitol Tuesday, June 13, 2017. The competition caps off a month-long essay contest in which students from around the state submitted essays about civil rights issues in our nation, state, and local communities. This year’s essay topics focused on … More 2017 KIDS COURT COMPETITION HELD AT THE STATE CAPITOL

CHRO CONCLUDES INVESTIGATION INTO THE RECRUITMENT, HIRING AND RETENTION OF MINORITY TEACHERS BY THE WATERBURY BOARD OF EDUCATION

The Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (“Commission”) has concluded its year-long investigation into the recruitment, hiring and retention of minority teachers in the City of Waterbury. The investigation included two public hearings in Waterbury, review of documents submitted from the public and nonprofit agencies, the production of thousands of documents from the City of … More CHRO CONCLUDES INVESTIGATION INTO THE RECRUITMENT, HIRING AND RETENTION OF MINORITY TEACHERS BY THE WATERBURY BOARD OF EDUCATION

Federal Appeals Court Allows Sexual Orientation Discrimination Claim in the Workplace

Earlier this week, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled, in an 8-3 majority, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects employees from workplace discrimination based on their sexual orientation. This decision comes weeks after the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the opposite way, stating Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act does … More Federal Appeals Court Allows Sexual Orientation Discrimination Claim in the Workplace

The Issue Regarding Re-Segregation in the Public School System

Over the last few years, re-segregation in school districts across the United States has become a pressing issue that isn’t often discussed. As the graduation rates of minorities across the United States continues to be much lower than their Caucasian counterparts, quality of education for these minority students must be addressed. One of the issues … More The Issue Regarding Re-Segregation in the Public School System

U.S. Supreme Court Rules that Disability Discrimination in Schools is not Pursuant to the Individual with Disabilities Act

The case, Fry v. Napoleon Community Schools, was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court last Wednesday. The majority opinion, by Justice Elena Kagan, confirmed that the parents of Ehlena Fry can sue school officials for not letting their child bring a service dog with her to school. Ehlena Fry is a 12 year old girl … More U.S. Supreme Court Rules that Disability Discrimination in Schools is not Pursuant to the Individual with Disabilities Act

U.S. Supreme Court Rules that Race-Based Testimony Should Not Be Used in Sentencing

The U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision this week in the case Buck v. Davis. The opinion by Chief Justice Roberts condemned the use of race-based testimony in sentencing and marks another victory for civil rights advocates. The facts underlying the case are gruesome. On July 30, 1995, Duane Buck went to his former … More U.S. Supreme Court Rules that Race-Based Testimony Should Not Be Used in Sentencing